Christian lawmaker on mission to “search and destroy” textbooks

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TEXAS … again! Republican lawmaker Gormless Matt Krause, above, who is involved with a group called Christians Engaged, clearly has far too much free time.

He made a list of 850 books that he wants to take out of public schools because they might:

Make students feel discomfort, guilt, anguish or any other form of psychological distress because of their race or gender.

Krause is now requested by the Freedom of Religion Foundation why he did not include the Bible in his “search and destroy” list. In a letter sent to the fanatic, the FFRF wrote:

You might want to look for books that you can find in almost any school library. A book advocates that rape victims marry their rapists. Another tells the story of a prostitute who “coveted her lovers, whose genitals were like those of donkeys and whose emission was like that of horses”, she “longed for the lust of your youth, when …[her] the breast has been caressed and your young breasts have been caressed.

In another, a future husband buys a wife by killing 200 enemies of his father, mutilating their corpses, and bringing back their foreskin as a dowry. Finally, a sordid and grotesque story which defames the victims of incest tells the exploits of two girls who, having just witnessed a genocide and the murder of their mother by an arsonist god, would have intoxicated their father and seduced him in order to to have children.

These and many more nasty and sexually explicit stories can be found in various books of the Bible.

The letter also states:

The FFRF militates above all for freedom of thought. We believe that there is no true freedom of thought, conscience or even religion, unless our government and its public schools are free from religion. We are deeply familiar with the haunting history of censorship – from the Catholic Church Index Forbidden librorum, the Comstock laws, the burning of Nazi books, the attacks on authors such as Charles Darwin and Salman Rushdie, and the murders of Bangladeshi bloggers
like Avijit Roy.

The Bible also condemns homosexuals to death and declares them an abomination. Where is your concern for the “discomfort, guilt, angst or any other form of psychological distress” that LGBTQ students might experience having such a book in their library? Where is your compassion for the children of color who might read “The Curse of the Ham” and feel marginalized? Where is the empathy for non-Christians who the Bible says should be burned and tortured for all eternity, for girls who are repeatedly told that women are “unclean” and must be submitted?

The FFRF declares on its website that Krause appears to be familiar with the contents of the Bible, as he frequently touts his position on the board of Christians Engaged and that group’s loyalty to the Bible. In fact, he wrote that “there is no better textbook” for “instilling” morality than the Bible.

The FFRF said it reminded them of Heinrich Heine’s famous observation: “Where they burn books, they will end up burning human beings.”

History never looks kindly on censors and book burners.

The organization published a brochure, An X-Rated Book: Sex and Obscenity in the Bible, which exhibits nearly 150 Bible verses displaying a “pornographic view of sex and women, obscenity, depravity and sexual violence often ordered or encouraged by the biblical deity.”

It is reported here that Krause sent a letter to the Texas Education Agency and state school district superintendents, asking each official to confirm whether their schools have any books on his list, along with a detailed account of their location and the amount of money spent on them.

The lawmaker did not explain what the next steps might be, but his request mentioned several recent efforts to remove books from libraries and classrooms if they focus on issues ranging from transgender identity to theory. criticism of the breed. He gave officials until November 12 to respond.

Books on Krause’s List include titles such as The great American anyway, a young adult novel by Tim Federle, and “Pink is a girl’s color” … and other stupid things people say, a children’s picture book by Stacy and Erik Drageset.

Non-fiction books are also on the list, from How prevalent is racism in society?, by Peggy J. Parks, on behalf of Amnesty International We are all born free: The Universal Declaration of Human Rights in pictures.

Image via Facebook

Krause’s request is a “disturbing political overtaking in the classroom” – and it could be illegal, said Ovidia Molina, above, president of the Texas State Teachers Association.

Nothing in state law … gives a legislator the power to conduct this type of witch-hunt. It is a clear attack on diversity and an attempt to score political points at the expense of our children’s education.

Some of the books on Krause’s List explain puberty and reproduction. Others discuss pregnancy and abortion, either from a textbook perspective or through fiction. At least 11 of the books focus on the benchmark Roe vs. Wade decision. that of John Irving The rules of the cider house, whose main characters include a doctor who performs abortions, is also on the list.

Many books speak of race. The list includes An African-American and Latin history of the United States, a title well reviewed by University of Florida historian Paul Ortiz who seeks to add nuance and precision to America’s long-accepted histories.

Krause made his impeachment request through the Texas House General Inquiry Committee, which he chairs.

But the Democratic vice-chairman of the panel said Krause’s mission was a waste of taxpayer dollars and educators’ time. State Representative Victoria Neave said it was an attempt to obscure the facts and exploit a wedge issue for political gain and “whitewash our history”.

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