Bible books – Holy Bibles http://holy-bibles.org/ Tue, 04 Oct 2022 11:19:35 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9 https://holy-bibles.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-32x32.png Bible books – Holy Bibles http://holy-bibles.org/ 32 32 Kirkwood and Webster School Districts Remove Books from Library Shelves | Webster Kirkwood Times https://holy-bibles.org/kirkwood-and-webster-school-districts-remove-books-from-library-shelves-webster-kirkwood-times/ Mon, 03 Oct 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://holy-bibles.org/kirkwood-and-webster-school-districts-remove-books-from-library-shelves-webster-kirkwood-times/ The graphic novel ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’, along with two collections of feminist poetry by Canadian poet Rupi Kaur, have been removed from the libraries of the Webster Groves and Kirkwood school districts. The Kirkwood School District has removed 14 books from its library collections in response to a Missouri Senate bill banning “explicit sexual materials” […]]]>






The graphic novel ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’, along with two collections of feminist poetry by Canadian poet Rupi Kaur, have been removed from the libraries of the Webster Groves and Kirkwood school districts.


The Kirkwood School District has removed 14 books from its library collections in response to a Missouri Senate bill banning “explicit sexual materials” in schools.

More than a dozen parents showed up at Monday’s school board meeting to oppose the removal of the books.

Senate Bill 775, which took effect Aug. 28, defines sexually explicit material as any pictorial, three-dimensional, or visual representation showing masturbation, sexual intercourse, or abuse, including with emphasis on the depiction of postpubertal genitalia. The bill provides exceptions for significant works of art or science.

Based on legal advice pursuant to Senate Bill 775, the Kirkwood School District has removed the following books from its collections:

• “The Handmaid’s Tale” (graphic novel)

• “Milk and honey”

• “The sun and its flowers”

• “1984: The Graphic Novel”

• “American Gods 1: Shadows”

• “American Gods 2: My Ainsel”

• “Annie Leibovitz at work”

• “Crime and Punishment” (graphic novel)

• “Gender Danger: Survivors of Rape, Human Trafficking and Honor Killings”

• “Gender Outlaws: The Next Generation”

• “Himawari House”

• “The Girls of Ys”

• “The human body in action”

• “Women”

Under the state’s new law, anyone affiliated with a private or public school who provides what is considered sexually explicit material to a student could be subject to a misdemeanor, subject to up to one year in prison and a fine of up to $2,000.

Several Kirkwood parents spoke out against the removal of the 14 books at the school board meeting on Monday, September 26. Others praised and championed district librarians for choosing books for young readers.

Julie Sells, who has children at Tillman Elementary School, Nipher Middle School and Kirkwood High School, said her children had great experiences with the “incredible” Tillman Elementary School librarian. .

“It takes incredible dedication, which would explain why we’re one of the top five districts in the state. The five major districts in the state do not censor books,” she said. “We have educated, experienced and special librarians who take the time to cultivate and list books and get to know our children to encourage them to read more.”

Kirkwood School Board member Judy Moticka said some of the books that have been removed provide much-needed representation for students.

“The thought that we would take away a child’s ability to find themselves, to understand themselves, to feel safe, is wrong,” she said. “As a community, we need to do better. You can select a passage from the Bible and some would say it is pornographic and inappropriate.

“I understand we’re dealing with lawyers and I don’t want you to get in trouble, but some of these books that have been taken down are works of art,” Moticka continued. “Just because it’s a subject that makes you uncomfortable as an adult doesn’t mean it’s wrong.”

Kirkwood School District School Board President Jean Marie Andrews, however, said the decision only relates to explicit sexual material.

“That conversation was never about not wanting children to be represented in the books. It’s not about race, sexual orientation, gender identity or CRT (critical race theory) Andrews said “It’s about content in books that if a member of staff read it aloud to students it would be a violation of several policies… We can represent all students without sexualizing them.”

In addition to books that have been removed, Kirkwood parents can refuse any titles they do not want their child to borrow from school libraries.

The Kirkwood Process

During Monday’s meeting, Bryan Painter, assistant superintendent of curriculum and instruction for the Kirkwood School District, touched on the district’s latest work in its book selection process, a conversation sparked in late 2021. During a school board meeting, parents confronted the board with a list of over 20 “inappropriate” books containing sexual content, drug use and other mature themes, asking how the books got into the school’s collection. library.

Painter said the district created a template for librarians to fill out when selecting books, including review highlights, curriculum ties and recommended age ranges. The template has so far been completed for approximately 80 books in the library’s collection.

“If at any time these books were to be challenged for reconsideration, we now have sufficient documentation to explain why they were considered in the first place,” he said.

Painter said the district would not label books with mature content because the move tended to bring more attention to such books in other districts.

In August, the district launched new forms for parents to remove their children from specific books. Parents can manually enter a book title or choose from a list of commonly challenged books. School-specific forms are available at www.kirkwoodschools.org/Page/10753. Parents can also access a list of books their child has borrowed from a school library.

Painter reminded parents that they can use Destiny Discover to explore books and other resources within a library collection at www.kirkwoodschools.org/destinydiscover.

Webster Groves School District Removes Books

In response to Senate Bill 775, the Webster Groves School District removed 11 books from its library collections, three of which are also on Kirkwood’s list. Books that Webster removed include:

• “The Handmaid’s Tale” (graphic novel)

• “Milk and honey”

• “The sun and its flowers”

• “Flame”

• “Queer Gender”

• “Breakfast of champions”

• “Guardians”

• “Home After Dark”

• “Zahra’s paradise”

• “Be gay, make comics”

• “Lighter than my shadow”

“While it is essential for us to comply with all applicable state laws to protect our educators from potential criminal charges, we will continue to strive to provide materials that reflect our student body and celebrate the diversity that exists. in the world around us,” said Derek Duncan. , district communications director.


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Sales of religious books soar https://holy-bibles.org/sales-of-religious-books-soar/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 01:30:21 +0000 https://holy-bibles.org/sales-of-religious-books-soar/ There has been a significant increase in the sale of religious press over the past year Association of American Publishers. In 2021, the religious press category grew by 21.9%, earning $1.42 billion. An increase of this magnitude is the first for religious publishing, and follows an 8% decline seen in 2020. The majority of revenue […]]]>

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There has been a significant increase in the sale of religious press over the past year Association of American Publishers. In 2021, the religious press category grew by 21.9%, earning $1.42 billion. An increase of this magnitude is the first for religious publishing, and follows an 8% decline seen in 2020.

The majority of revenue came from hardback sales (58.4%), followed by audio sales which were 7%. For the first time ever, downloadable religious audio sales have surpassed all other e-book sales, earning $100 million in 2021. (Weekly editors)

According Guinness World Records, The best-selling book of all time is the Christian Bible. It is not possible to know precisely how many copies have been printed in the nearly 1,500 years since it was brought into conformity and standardization, however, research conducted in 2021 by the British and Foreign Bible Society indicated a total number estimated between 5 and 7 billion copies. .

  • 5-7 billion copies of the Bible estimated in print
  • 800 million copies of the Quran estimated printed
  • 120 million copies of the Book of Mormon estimated in print (wordsrated.com)
Sales revenue of religious books in the United States from 2017 to 2021 (Statista.com)

Weekly editors reports that “results are part off AAP final estimate of total industry sales, which combines sales directly provided by publishers with projections for companies that do not report data to the association. Nine ECPA members contribute data to the report. Earlier in the year, the The AAP reported that sales of religious presses increased by 11% in 2021 out of 2020.


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Please ban my books – New York Daily News https://holy-bibles.org/please-ban-my-books-new-york-daily-news/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://holy-bibles.org/please-ban-my-books-new-york-daily-news/ Over the past 10 years, I’ve had four novels published, and while reviews were mostly decent, sales were just south of lackluster. This recently inspired my agent to suggest I write a blockbuster to save my career. She was not facetious. I gave him a week of torture, got nowhere, and ended up deleting everything […]]]>

Over the past 10 years, I’ve had four novels published, and while reviews were mostly decent, sales were just south of lackluster. This recently inspired my agent to suggest I write a blockbuster to save my career. She was not facetious. I gave him a week of torture, got nowhere, and ended up deleting everything I wrote, which was a first line (“One week after Lawrence was murdered in Cleveland, he reappeared in Tijuana selling sombreros to tourists at a beach called Los Muertos, which is Spanish for ‘the dead.’”)

Speaking of deaths, there was only one other way to resurrect my career of permanent literary burial. I would have to put one of my novels on the new list of banned books.

Although Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis and Texas Gov. Greg Abbott and other red state chief executives haven’t technically banned any specific books, new legislation in theirs and other States allows parents, teachers, and librarians to challenge any book they deem “inappropriate.” Currently, the focus is primarily on novels that explore LGBTQ identity issues, but the law leaves the door wide open.

DeSantis also favored the rejection of a record number of math textbooks, reasoning that they contained “indoctrination…racial essentialism,” which is code for critical race theory. Keep in mind that this is a governor who graduated with honors from Yale Law School and Harvard and taught history (the story!). Now he rejects math textbooks for silly reasons that are nothing more than Republican whistles. Could he be a presidential candidate? No.

These laws are seen by many as the equivalent of outright literary censorship. As a result, books that were banned in the past are back in the public spotlight. Lists and copies of formerly banned books abound on Internet bookstores. The Brooklyn Public Library started a project giving teenagers all over America access to books that may be banned in their schools. There was a Banned Book Week recently where readers celebrated the books that have been pulled from school and library shelves for a variety of absurd reasons over the years. In protest or just out of curiosity, people buy them as if there is an embargo.

It’s a proven dynamic: tell people they can’t read a book – say “Ulysses”and they will go to a bookseller where they can find it, buy a copy wrapped in newspaper, try to read it and end up looking for the dirty parts.

Over the years, hundreds of books – fiction and non-fiction – have been pulled from library shelves and classrooms. Some remain absent to this day. Many of these books contain elements that certain moralizing types once found or still find unacceptable, such as profanity, vulgarity, descriptions of nudity and sex, or political themes that deviate from the mainstream.

Most sexual content is restrained by today’s standards. (Fun fact: “Charlotte’s Web” was banned in a Kansas school district in 2006 because talking animals were considered unnatural and therefore blasphemous. Is “Pinocchio” next? has that suggestive nose…)

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Given these criteria, my novels should definitely be banned! Perhaps none of them are taught in classrooms, but most reside on library shelves from Montana to Florida. Most likely no one has ever checked any of them, but I could easily create an online marketing campaign to convince conservative librarians, school boards, and Ron DeSantis that my novels are offensive and should be taken off the shelves.

For example: In one of my books, an amateur historian discovers that President Millard Fillmore was gay. In another, a colonoscopy is described in detail, and we all know what part of the human body this procedure involves. One of my protagonists does not respect his mother and father, commits adultery and frequently takes God’s name in vain, a biblical trifecta!

Even better, a character’s grandmother was a Holocaust survivor. According to some book banners, the Holocaust was a hoax – so auf wiedersehen to this novel.

Critical Race Theory isn’t in any of my books, but since it’s mostly fantasy, it doesn’t have to be in the book for people to say it’s in the book.

Landing on the banned books list isn’t just about the money. It would be a distinct honor for my name to appear on a list that includes such literary giants as Gustave Flaubert, James Baldwin, John Steinbeck, George Orwell, Ray Bradbury, Toni Morrison, Harper Lee, JD Salinger and Kurt Vonnegut, to name but a few. only a few whose books have been banned in the past or still are in some places.

Govt. DeSantis and Abbott, parents, school boards, librarians, please ban my books! Or maybe just one. I’m not greedy.

Blumenthal is a writer.


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Six are Latin American on the list https://holy-bibles.org/six-are-latin-american-on-the-list/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 14:36:10 +0000 https://holy-bibles.org/six-are-latin-american-on-the-list/ Argentina’s Jorge Luis Borges in the best 100-pound position ever. Six books by Latin American authors make up the ranking Spanish media produced by ABC The 100 Best Books in World LiteratureArgentina Jorge Luis Borges You Domingo Faustino SarmientoMexican Juan Rufocuban man Nicolas Guillon and Colombian Gabriel Garcia MarquezHis two works, together with the list, […]]]>

Argentina’s Jorge Luis Borges in the best 100-pound position ever.

Six books by Latin American authors make up the ranking Spanish media produced by ABC The 100 Best Books in World LiteratureArgentina Jorge Luis Borges You Domingo Faustino SarmientoMexican Juan Rufocuban man Nicolas Guillon and Colombian Gabriel Garcia MarquezHis two works, together with the list, constitute more than 50 critics and authors consulted by the Spanish publication.

fiction Jorge Luis Borges and Facundo or Civilization and Barbary There are two books selected by Domingo in the Faustino Sarmiento ranking in which critics and authors each had to select the ten most original literary works by criteria.

Yes indeed, in post 33 remained the most universal writer of Argentine literature, Jorge Luis BorgesChosen for the volume of its stories fictionFrom 1944, where such texts appear in history as follows garden of forking paths, Pierre Maynard, author of Don Quixote south You circular ruins,

Domingo Faustino Sarmiento – Politician, teacher, ethics, essayist – came in at #78 with essays Facundo or Civilization and Barbary, a work which began to be serialized in 1845 and became a text of immense influence. This book has just been republished by Infobae let’s read and downloadable for free.

[”Facundo” se puede descargar gratis de Bajalibros clickeando acá]

Gabriel Garcia MarquezColombian and winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature, is the best Latin American of the selection: his novel, perhaps the most emblematic, A hundred years of lonelinessposition reached 24 list, while Love in the Time of Cholera was placed in position 53,

Juan Rufo and his first novel, Pedro Paramo, first published as a series and then as a book in 1955, also reached the chart established by ABC. in his work, which earned him this position 41 In the list, the author told how mexican revolution corrupted many of their leaders.

For its part, Cuba Nicolas Guillon It was also among Latin American sports on a list compiled by ABC. The so-called “national poet of Cuba”, who was also a journalist and who, through his literary and non-fiction works, reflected on the Afro-descendant population of the Caribbean island, took with him the list of the best universal literature. Work Songoro Kosongolocated on the post 61, This is a collection of poems that distinguished him as the great writer of his country. Posted in: 1931managed to combine colloquial Cuban expressions with rhythms of songs inherited from Africa.

They choose the hundred best books of all time: six are Latin American on the list

[”Cien años de soledad” puede conseguirse en formato digital en Bajalibros clickeando acá]

writers and critics such as Fernando Aramburu -author of Country-, Argentina Rodrigo Fresson, Arturo Perez-Riverte -author of falconIn many other books – Lorenzo Silva, Berta Vice Mhow, Enrique Villa Matasso and Manuel Vilas, among others.

Accordingly, a list that demonstrates the strength and early validity of the classical texts is as follows: Quixote of Cervantes, first place, then the odyssey You Iliad of Homer; The Divine Comedy of Alighieri; small village of Shakespeare; and the sixth the Bible,

For female writers, the first to arrive at 11th place is Emily Bronte Thief The Wuthering HeightsAfter Emily Dickinson And his poems, Natalia Ginzburg You family vocabulary, Iris Murdoch You sea, sea, Saint Teresa of Jesus By Residence You Jane Austen By Emma,

They choose the hundred best books of all time: six are Latin American on the list

[”Ficciones” se puede adquirir, en formato digital, en Bajalibros, clickeando acá]

Other functions that, according to the opinion of the guests, fulfill a hundred original functions are: the invention of lonelinessof Paul Auster, The year of Ricardo Riso’s deathof Joseph Saramago70. frankensteinof Mary Shelley, my roomof Virginia Woolf, poet in new yorkof Federico Garcia LorcaYou Transformof Franz Kafka.

With information from Telam SE

continue reading

First crack in Sarmiento and Argentina “completely helpless” and “followed by nature”

Three stories to remember Jorge Luis Borges

‘Indians don’t think’: Sarmiento’s most critical thoughts in a book that can be read for free today

Maria Kodama was at Infobe to record the story she met with Borges


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Panhandle Florida teacher wants 117 books removed for being obscene https://holy-bibles.org/panhandle-florida-teacher-wants-117-books-removed-for-being-obscene/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 18:17:06 +0000 https://holy-bibles.org/panhandle-florida-teacher-wants-117-books-removed-for-being-obscene/ VALRICO, Fla. — A private religious school in Florida told parents that LGBTQ children “will be asked to leave school immediately” and called gay people “sinners” in a June email. In the June 6 email obtained by BNC NewsGrace Christian School administrator Barry McKeen said LGBTQ people are “sinners in the eyes of God and […]]]>

VALRICO, Fla. — A private religious school in Florida told parents that LGBTQ children “will be asked to leave school immediately” and called gay people “sinners” in a June email.

In the June 6 email obtained by BNC NewsGrace Christian School administrator Barry McKeen said LGBTQ people are “sinners in the eyes of God and the church” and that “students who participate in these lifestyles will be asked to leave the school immediately.

He also compared LGBTQ “lifestyles” to “bestiality, incest, fornication, adultery and pornography” while citing Bible verses.

Additionally, the email said the school – located in Valrico, Florida, 20 miles east of Tampa – would only refer to students by “gender on their birth certificates”.

“We believe that God created humanity in his image: male (man) and female (woman), sexually different but with equal dignity,” McKeen wrote in the email, according to NBC News.

He added: “Therefore, one’s biological sex must be affirmed and no attempt should be made to physically change, alter or disagree with one’s biological sex – including but not limited to elective sex change. , transvestite, transgender, or nonbinary acts of gender-fluid conduct (Genesis 1:26-28).

The Los Angeles Blade could not independently confirm the contents of the email but have attempted to contact representatives for Grace Christian. The school did not return the request.

McKeen responded to the NBC News article on Facebookconfirming that Grace Christian does not allow “gay or transgender” students because it is “rooted in scripture”.

“God has spoken about these issues, explicitly, aggressively, and we’ve had these policies in our school since day one in the early 1970s,” McKeen said. “It’s not new.”

McKeen also said the policy would remain.

“We are not a hateful group of people,” he said. “We don’t hate students who are particularly persuasive.”

NBC News also reported that the email played a role in the transfer of a 16-year-old student, who is gay, to a more religiously accepting school. The outlet did not name the student or her mother, citing fear of harassment,

“It’s not like my daughter is wearing rainbow flags or anything like that,” the teen’s mother said. “But I’m not going to make her feel ashamed of herself for any reason.”

The student said she felt “normal” at the new school.

The NBC News reports come as heads of state call for and pass laws to limit the rights of LGBTQ youth. Florida’s so-called ‘Don’t Say Gay’ bill went into effect June 30 confusing as teachers cautiously wait to see how the law will be interpreted and applied. attorneys general of 16 states have filed a complaint against the law.

It’s also at least the second time this month that a religious school has been accused of shunning the LGBTQ community, according to NBC News. In Louisiana, a A Christian school asked a same-sex couple to find a new school for their child because of “lifestyle choices”.


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St. Louis-area suburban school districts more likely to ban books under new law https://holy-bibles.org/st-louis-area-suburban-school-districts-more-likely-to-ban-books-under-new-law/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 13:45:00 +0000 https://holy-bibles.org/st-louis-area-suburban-school-districts-more-likely-to-ban-books-under-new-law/ ST. LOUIS — The 97 books banned from St. Louis schools this fall cover topics including anatomy, photography and the Holocaust. There are books that are also popular TV series, including “Game of Thrones”, “The Handmaid’s Tale”, “The Walking Dead”, and “Watchmen”. And since life imitates art, the Kirkwood School District has banned a comic […]]]>

ST. LOUIS — The 97 books banned from St. Louis schools this fall cover topics including anatomy, photography and the Holocaust. There are books that are also popular TV series, including “Game of Thrones”, “The Handmaid’s Tale”, “The Walking Dead”, and “Watchmen”.

And since life imitates art, the Kirkwood School District has banned a comic book adaptation of George Orwell’s “1984,” the cautionary tale of government mind control.

A new state law banning “explicit sexual material” — defined as any visual depiction of sexual acts or genitalia, with exceptions for artistic or scientific significance — went into effect in late August and applies to public and private schools.

People also read…

Teachers and librarians scoured their book lists for any applicable content under the guidance of attorneys. But the interpretation of the law varies by geography, according to a post-expedition analysis of public records:

• Ten school districts in the city of St. Louis and mostly near suburbs plan to ignore the law and not alter their library collections. University City this week released a photo of banned books displayed in the college library with a sign reading “We read banned books.”

• Four suburban districts—Francis Howell in St. Charles County and Kirkwood, Lindbergh, and Rockwood in St. Louis County—each removed more than 12 books from their schools.

• The Wentzville School District banned one book and removed 223 others “for further review,” including dozens of art history books and “children’s Bible stories.”

• Two Jefferson County districts, Fox and Festus, have not banned any books. A Festus spokesperson clarified that the documents falling under the law “have never been in school libraries in the first place”.

According to the American Library Association, the number of nationwide book bans this school year is on track to surpass last year’s record total. The spike comes amid a culture war over how educators should teach about race, gender and sexuality.

“When you dictate what people can read, what people can choose, that’s the mark of an authoritarian society, not a democratic society,” said Deborah Caldwell-Stone, director of the office of the association for intellectual freedom. “We really have to ask ourselves what we mean for the education of our young people.”

The local banned books map tends to align with political trends, with districts in conservative areas removing more titles. Suburban school boards in St. Charles County and western St. Louis County have also faced repeated book challenges from residents over the past two years.

The three most frequently targeted books were the graphic novel “The Handmaid’s Tale,” banned in 10 local school districts; “Gender Queer”, banned in seven districts and “Watchmen”, banned in four districts. Half of the 10 most frequently pulled books from classrooms and school libraries feature LGBTQ characters and themes, and several more involve racism.

Of the 97 books that have been banned by schools in the St. Louis area, 86 have been targeted by a single district. High profile examples include:

• The Ritenour School District has banned Art Spiegelman’s “Maus,” a Pulitzer Prize-winning Holocaust graphic novel that depicts Jews as mice and Nazis as cats. When “Maus” was banned earlier this year by a Tennessee school district, the US Holocaust Museum said the book “played a vital role in Holocaust education by sharing the detailed and personal experiences of victims and survivors”.

• Lindbergh banned ‘A Dangerous Woman: The Graphic Biography of Emma Goldman’, about the radical and anarchist political activist, as well as several volumes of ‘Game of Thrones’ and ‘The Walking Dead’ series.

• In addition to “1984: The Graphic Novel”, Kirkwood banned “Crime and Punishment: A Graphic Novel”, “Annie Leibovitz at Work” about the famous photographer and “The Human Body in Action”, a 1999 manual with a chapter titled “Making Babies”.

The ACLU of Missouri issued a statement last month saying that books in school libraries are not subject to the state’s new law because they have “already been reviewed against well-established national standards for selecting materials that take into account the whole piece”.

But some headteachers have said the threat of lawsuits necessitates a conservative approach to disposing of the books.

“The sad reality of Senate Bill 775 is that, now in effect, it includes criminal penalties for individual educators. We are unwilling to risk these potential consequences and will err on the side of caution on behalf of those who serve our students,” Kirkwood spokeswoman Steph Deidrick said.

Table: Most banned books by area school districts

The Post-Dispatch contacted 28 area school districts to ask which books, if any, they banned from their shelves. This table shows the most banned books among the responding districts. The 28 districts included all of those in St. Louis County, plus St. Louis Public Schools and the districts of Festus, Fox, Fort Zumwalt, Francis Howell, and Wentzville. Three districts did not provide data: Fort Zumwalt, Jennings and Webster Groves.

Book Num. districts
The Handmaid’s Tale: The Graphic Novel ten
Gender Queer: A Memoir seven
watchmen 5
Flame 4
Home after dark 4
The sun and its flowers 4

The Missouri Library Association has denounced the book bans, saying schools must protect the academic freedom of their students and the autonomy of their educators.

“By choosing to preemptively remove graphic novels from your collection, you are sending the message to your students that you support the intent (of the law), which is to restrict access to information, art and culturally relevant materials in your collection,” reads a Sept. 9 letter from the association to Rockwood trustees. “We ask you as leaders in your district to be courageous in the face of this law, to support your staff and students, and to stand with us against censorship.”

The state sponsor of the bill, senator. Rick Bratin, R-Harrisonville, tweeted this month that he is “proud to have banned these books from school libraries. It’s crazy that people think it’s appropriate for school-aged kids.

Students react to book bans

No private schools reported removing books in response to the law. High school students taking an AP literature course at Crossroads College Prep in St. Louis described the book bans as condescending, insulting and disturbing.

“Banning these books weaves another layer over this blanket of ignorance,” said Tré Humphries, 17.

In a recent class, Crossroads students discussed Ralph Ellison’s “The Invisible Man” and other books that have been banned. Sarah Pierson Wolff, an English teacher and co-director of the school, said a Crossroads attorney briefed administrators on the new state law, but no books were taken down.

“The idea of ​​trying to limit what people have access to is something we fight against,” Wolff said. “For someone to say a book is dangerous is scary.”

Book bans have also been known to backfire, prompting students to seek out books that would otherwise sit untouched on the library shelf.

“The fact is, if you’re an enterprising teenager and you want a copy of ‘Gender Queer,’ you’ll get it,” said Linda Johnson, president and CEO of Brooklyn Public Library in New York. “Either the elected officials or the parents or the school administrators are naive, or there is something else at stake.”

In April, the library launched Books Unbanned, providing free online access to its entire collection for ages 13 to 21. There have been spikes in demand from students living in school districts that have banned titles, Johnson said.

Families in Wentzville, where the school district is being sued for book bans, will partner with the ACLU to host a strategy session on “student rights” Oct. 2 at the local library.

“It’s important for students to learn how to defend themselves,” said Zebrina Looney, whose four children attended schools in Wentzville. “They’re the ones going off to college and potentially not being equipped with the knowledge that their counterparts had.”

Targeted graphic novels

Jerry Craft hated reading as a kid and thinks it’s because the African American protagonists were enslaved, imprisoned, or fought for civil rights.

“At 12, why can’t I have a Harry Potter? said Craft. “I write the books I wish I had as a kid. Kids just want to be seen.

When Craft learned that his book “New Kid” had been challenged by parents in Texas because of “critical race theory,” he had to Google the term. The Newbery Award-winning graphic novel is about a black boy who experiences culture shock when he transfers to a private school.

“My goal was to tell a story that was loosely based on my life and the lives of my two sons and the lives of a group of my friends,” said Craft, who spoke about the banned comics Thursday at the Central Library. of St. Louis. “One of the things most people don’t do is read the book or ask a kid what they think about it. This is one of the biggest problems – kids are often an afterthought.

Teachers say graphic novels are valuable tools for engaging reluctant readers, English learners and people with learning disabilities. Visuals combined with text can lead to deeper understanding and analysis of a book.

But there’s a general misunderstanding of the term graphic novel, which refers to the illustrated comic book format of the books, not the content, said Jeff Trexler, acting director of the New York-based Comic Book Legal Defense Fund.

Federal lawmakers marked Banned Books Week on Thursday by introducing resolutions condemning school book bans, calling them unconstitutional.

“The overall tragedy of banning books in schools is that they are classes protected from discrimination,” Trexler said. “You’re going to get people thrown in jail for showing First Amendment protected material.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.


Blythe Bernhard on New State Law Impacting School Librarians: Inside the Post-Dispatch


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Book Shows ‘Mockingbird’ Author Harper Lee’s Personal Side https://holy-bibles.org/book-shows-mockingbird-author-harper-lees-personal-side/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 09:30:15 +0000 https://holy-bibles.org/book-shows-mockingbird-author-harper-lees-personal-side/ In the world, Harper Lee was aloof to the point of being unknowable, an obsessively private person who spent most of her life avoiding the public gaze despite writing one of the best-selling books of all time, “To Kill a Mockingbird”. For Wayne Flynt, the Alabama-born author was his friend, Nelle. Buy now | Our […]]]>

In the world, Harper Lee was aloof to the point of being unknowable, an obsessively private person who spent most of her life avoiding the public gaze despite writing one of the best-selling books of all time, “To Kill a Mockingbird”. For Wayne Flynt, the Alabama-born author was his friend, Nelle.

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Flynt, a longtime Southern historian who befriended Nelle Harper Lee late in her life, wrote her second book about the author, ‘Afternoons with Harper Lee,’ which was released with Flynt on Thursday. signing copies at a suburban bookstore birmingham.

Based on Flynt’s notes from dozens of visits with Lee over a decade before his death in 2016, the book is like sitting on a porch and hearing stories about Lee’s childhood and family in Alabama. rural, his later life in New York and everything in between. That includes the time a grandfather who fought for the Confederacy survived the Battle of Gettysburg despite heavy casualties for his Alabama unit, according to Flynt.

“I said to him, ‘You know, half of the 15th Alabama was either killed or wounded or captured, and he got away? Is it just luck or God’s providence? What is that ? said Flynt in an interview with The Associated Press.

“And she said, ‘No, it’s not God’s providence. He could run fast.

This cover image published by NewSouth Books shows “Afternoons with Harper Lee” by Wayne Flynt. (NewSouth Books via AP)

The public perception of Lee as a hermit is wrong, said Flynt, a former history professor at Auburn University. No, she didn’t do media interviews and she zealously kept her life private, but she was also warm and kind to her friends, including a former first lady, Lady Bird Johnson, Flynt said. And Lee was “deeply religious” in a way that many people aren’t, he said.

“It’s an attempt to tell the story of the authentic woman, not the marble lady,” Flynt said.

The book is also a tribute to Flynt’s late wife, Dartie, who died in 2020. Lee, who suffered a stroke in 2007, seemed to identify with the physical struggles of Dartie Flynt, who suffered from Parkinson’s disease, Flynt said.

“I think she tolerated me because she loved Dartie,” he said.

Born in 1926 when the South was still racially segregated by law, Lee grew up in the southern Alabama town of Monroeville, the daughter of an attorney who served as a role model for attorney Atticus Finch in “To Kill a Mockingbird”, a breed story. , injustice and the law in Jim Crow times. The town itself became Maycomb, the setting of the book.

Preferring football, softball, golf, and books to small-town social affairs or college sororities, Lee’s well-known desire for privacy may stem in part from a sense of being different from others growing up around of her in the South, Flynt said.

“I think she occupied a world where she felt she wasn’t like the other girls,” he said.

A childhood friend of fellow author Truman Capote, Lee was rarely heard from in public after her part-autobiographical “Mockingbird” won the Pulitzer Prize in 1961 and became a hit movie. She mainly lived in an apartment in Manhattan, where it was easier to blend in than at home until the stroke left her partially paralyzed.

Flynt and his late wife knew Lee’s two sisters, and they became close to the author after he returned to Alabama for good after the stroke. They visited her at a rehabilitation center in Birmingham and then at an assisted living facility in Monroeville, where she spent years before her death. Lee died just months after the release of her novel “Go Set a Watchman,” which was actually an early version of “Mockingbird.”

The book does not touch on the most intimate aspects of Lee’s life; Flynt said they just didn’t discuss such things. But he recounts the worsening of his isolation due to deafness and blindness towards the end of his life; his love of the game; the fury over “Watchman”; and his authorship of an as yet unpublished manuscript on a bizarre murder case in central Alabama.

Lee was steeped in literature and religion, Flynt said. She preferred the King James Version of the Bible to all others for its lyrical language, he said, and her favorite authors included Jane Austen and C. S. Lewis.

“When she died, on her ottoman in her two small rooms, was the complete anthology of all CS Lewis books. He must have weighed 50 pounds,” he said.

“Afternoons With Harper Lee” is a sequel to Flynt’s “Mockingbird Songs: My Friendship with Harper Lee”. While the first book was based on letters in between, the new book is more meandering and conversational than the first in the tradition of Southern storytelling.

“The letters are lifeless compared to the stories,” he said.

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Rochelle News-Leader | The forbidden books that I have read https://holy-bibles.org/rochelle-news-leader-the-forbidden-books-that-i-have-read/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 17:14:36 +0000 https://holy-bibles.org/rochelle-news-leader-the-forbidden-books-that-i-have-read/ As my parents were walking down a street in China, a man slipped up next to my mother and asked if they had a Bible. In accented English, he explained that some Americans brought Bibles to distribute in this communist country. My parents were hog farmers from Illinois who over the years visited their counterparts […]]]>

As my parents were walking down a street in China, a man slipped up next to my mother and asked if they had a Bible.

In accented English, he explained that some Americans brought Bibles to distribute in this communist country. My parents were hog farmers from Illinois who over the years visited their counterparts in China, Ukraine, Poland and Denmark to exchange ideas.

When Mom told this story over 30 years ago, I felt so grateful to live in a country where the government didn’t tell people what they could read.

I’m not sure I live in such a place anymore.

Unfortunately, we live in a society where people on the left and right try to determine what other people can read.

I’m dumb enough that when someone tells me not to read something, that’s the first thing I add to my reading list.

Years ago a fellow Protestant mocked my curiosity about the Apocrypha, the four books of the Bible recognized by the Catholic Church but not by most Protestant denominations.

My response was to read it. It helped me understand the differences between Catholic and Protestant teachings. He adds greater context to the 400 years before the birth of Jesus and his prose is beautiful.

Today, race is often central to the book ban debate. I recently interviewed Republican gubernatorial candidate Darren Bailey and he said critical race theory should not be taught in schools.

Proponents of the teaching of “critical race theory” argue that race is a social construct and that racism is not simply the product of individual prejudice or prejudice, but also something embedded in legal systems and policies. Conservative critics counter that the basis of the theory is that the United States is fundamentally racist and that it leads students to feel guilty for the past actions of white people.

How about letting the kids read the works and decide for themselves?

Critics of critical race theory often point to the New York Times Magazine’s “1619 Project,” a Pulitzer Prize-winning endeavor that examines the legacy of 400 years of slavery on what is now the United States. United.

For Christmas last year, my wife gave me a copy of “Project 1619”. It was a fascinating read. A few conclusions in the book that I agreed with. Others don’t. But it is okay. When you read something, it should provoke thought, not buy-in.

I also make a point of reading authors with whom I know I will not agree. Sometimes I even read material that I know I will find revolting.

For example, in 1995, following the Oklahoma City bombing, I walked into a bookstore in Davenport, Iowa, and asked if they had a copy of the “Turner Diaries,” a racist book that would have inspired the bombers.

The older woman who owned the store narrowed her eyes and growled, “We don’t sell that here.” Do you want to bomb something? »

No. But I wanted to infer some understanding of the hatred that motivated the terrorists. When I finally got a copy, I found the ideas it espoused disgusting. But it gave me insight into the warped reasoning behind the white nationalist movement.

One of my favorite books is “To Kill a Mockingbird”. When I read the novel as a teenager, I was mesmerized by the story of a lawyer who opposes a racist justice system in the South. I loved the book so much that when we were expecting our second daughter, I wanted to name her “Scout” after the book’s protagonist. (My wife rejected the idea.)

Today, there is pressure to ban the book in schools. Some people dislike him because he uses a racial epithet in the context of Southern culture at the time. Others say it’s misogynistic because it’s a false accusation of rape. Still others don’t like a white man being chosen as the hero trying to save a black man.

All of these criticisms seem to be fueling a class discussion. Instead, wimpy school administrators prohibit its use.

So, what do I read during forbidden book week? Well, “Diary of a Misfit” is a great non-fiction read. It’s about a lesbian journalist who returns to rural Louisiana, where she grew up, to create a documentary about a transgender man her grandmother knew in the 1940s.

I’m not done with it, but so far it’s a brilliant read.

I also read “Every Good Endeavor” by Timothy Keller, an evangelical pastor who talks about finding spiritual purpose in our work. I like to discuss it with others early on Wednesday mornings.

Reading builds bridges of understanding between disparate groups. In our divided society, what could be a better goal?

Scott Reeder, Writer for Illinois Times, can be reached at: [email protected].


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Forbidden books can build bridges | Weekly Reading https://holy-bibles.org/forbidden-books-can-build-bridges-weekly-reading/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 09:14:04 +0000 https://holy-bibles.org/forbidden-books-can-build-bridges-weekly-reading/ Click to enlarge As my parents were walking down a street in China, a man slipped up next to my mother and asked if they had a Bible. In accented English, he explained that some Americans brought Bibles to distribute in this communist country. My parents were hog farmers from Illinois who […]]]>

As my parents were walking down a street in China, a man slipped up next to my mother and asked if they had a Bible.

In accented English, he explained that some Americans brought Bibles to distribute in this communist country. My parents were hog farmers from Illinois who over the years visited their counterparts in China, Ukraine, Poland and Denmark to exchange ideas.

When Mom told this story over 30 years ago, I felt so grateful to live in a country where the government didn’t tell people what they could read.

I’m not sure I live in such a place anymore.

Unfortunately, we live in a society where people on the left and right try to determine what other people can read.

I’m dumb enough that when someone tells me not to read something, that’s the first thing I add to my reading list.

Years ago a fellow Protestant mocked my curiosity about the Apocrypha, the four books of the Bible recognized by the Catholic Church but not by most Protestant denominations.

My response was to read it. It helped me understand the differences between Catholic and Protestant teachings. It adds greater context to the 400 years before Jesus was born, and its prose is beautiful.

Today, race is often central to the book ban debate. I recently interviewed Republican gubernatorial candidate Darren Bailey and he said that critical race theory shouldn’t be taught in schools, which it isn’t currently.

Proponents of critical race theory teaching argue that race is a social construct and that racism is not simply the product of individual prejudice or prejudice, but also something embedded in systems and legal policies. Conservative critics counter that the basis of the theory is that the United States is fundamentally racist and that it leads students to feel guilty for the past actions of white people.

How about letting the kids read the works and decide for themselves?

Critics of the CRT often point out The Project 1619a Pulitzer Prize-winning company by the New York Times Review looking at the legacy of 400 years of slavery in what is now the United States.

For Christmas last year my wife gave me a copy of The 1619 Project. It was a fascinating read. A few conclusions in the book that I agreed with. Others don’t. But it is okay. When you read something, it should provoke thought, not buy-in.

I also make a point of reading authors with whom I know I will not agree. Sometimes I even read material that I know I will find revolting.

For example, in 1995, following the Oklahoma City bombing, I walked into a bookstore in Davenport, Iowa, and asked if they had a copy of Turner’s Diary, a racist tome that would have inspired the suicide bomber.

The older woman who owned the store narrowed her eyes and growled, “We don’t sell that here.” Do you want to bomb something?

No. But I wanted to infer some understanding of the hatred that motivated the terrorists. When I finally got a copy, I found the ideas it espoused disgusting. But it gave me insight into the warped reasoning behind the white nationalist movement.

One of my favorite books is Kill a mockingbird. When I read the novel as a teenager, I was mesmerized by the story of a lawyer who opposes a racist justice system in the South. I loved the book so much that when we were expecting our second daughter, I wanted to name her Scout after the book’s protagonist (my wife rejected the idea).

Today, there is pressure to ban the book in schools. Some people dislike him because he uses a racial epithet in the context of Southern culture at the time. Others say it’s misogynistic because it’s a false accusation of rape. Still others don’t like a white man being chosen as the hero trying to save a black man.

All of these criticisms seem to be fueling a class discussion. Instead, wimpy school administrators prohibit its use.

So, what do I read during forbidden book week? Good, Diary of a Misfit is a great non-fiction read. It’s about a lesbian journalist who returns to rural Louisiana, where she grew up, to create a documentary about a transgender man her grandmother knew in the 1940s.

I’m not done with it, but so far it’s a brilliant read.

I also read Every good effort by Timothy Keller, an evangelical pastor who discusses finding spiritual purpose in our work. I like to discuss it with others early on Wednesday mornings.

Reading builds bridges of understanding between disparate groups. In our divided society, what could be a better goal?

Scott Reeder, Writer for Illinois Times, can be contacted at sreeder@illinoistimes.com.


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‘Dangerous’ books too powerful to read https://holy-bibles.org/dangerous-books-too-powerful-to-read/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 23:36:01 +0000 https://holy-bibles.org/dangerous-books-too-powerful-to-read/ The legend of the Sibylline Books tells us that in an ancient city, a woman offered to sell her citizens 12 books containing all the knowledge and wisdom of the world, for a high price. They refused, thinking her request was ridiculous, so she burned half the books on the spot, then offered to sell […]]]>

The legend of the Sibylline Books tells us that in an ancient city, a woman offered to sell her citizens 12 books containing all the knowledge and wisdom of the world, for a high price. They refused, thinking her request was ridiculous, so she burned half the books on the spot, then offered to sell the remaining six for double the price. The citizens laughed at her, a little ill at ease this time. She burned three, offering the rest, but again doubling the price. Somewhat reluctantly – times were tough, their troubles seemed to be multiplying – they fired her once again. Finally, when only one book remained, the citizens paid the extraordinary price the woman now demanded, and she left them alone, to make do as best they could with a twelfth of all knowledge and the wisdom of the world.

Books are carriers of knowledge. They are pollinators of our minds, spreading self-replicating ideas across space and time. We forget what a miracle it is that marks on a page or a screen can allow communication from one brain to another at the other end of the globe, or at the other end of the century.

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– Radical books rewriting sex
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– The unsung masterpieces of 1922

Books are, as Stephen King said, “unique portable magic” – and the portable part is as important as the magic. A book can be carried away, kept hidden, your own private storehouse of knowledge. (My son’s diary has an ineffective – but symbolically important padlock.) The power of words inside books is so great that it has long been customary to erase certain words: like swear words, like any person encountering a “d—-d” in a 19th century novel will know; or words too dangerous to write, such as the name of God in some religious texts.

Books are carriers of knowledge, and knowledge is synonymous with power, which makes books a threat to authorities – governments and self-appointed rulers – who want to have a monopoly on knowledge and control what their citizens think. And the most effective way to exercise that power over books is to ban them.

Book banning has a long and dastardly history, but it’s not dead: it remains a thriving industry. This week is the 40th anniversary of Banned Books Week, an annual event “celebrating the freedom to read”. Banned Books Week was launched in 1982 in response to an increase in book protests in schools, libraries and bookstores.


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