Bible books – Holy Bibles http://holy-bibles.org/ Mon, 06 Dec 2021 02:49:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://holy-bibles.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-32x32.png Bible books – Holy Bibles http://holy-bibles.org/ 32 32 The curious way in which Saint Ambrose read books https://holy-bibles.org/the-curious-way-in-which-saint-ambrose-read-books/ Sun, 05 Dec 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://holy-bibles.org/the-curious-way-in-which-saint-ambrose-read-books/ And how that led to what we now call lectio divina. The first books we learned to love were probably stories read aloud by a parent, teacher, or older sibling. Maybe you went to a story hour at the library and sat down with the other kids and listened. If you had siblings, maybe mom […]]]>

And how that led to what we now call lectio divina.

The first books we learned to love were probably stories read aloud by a parent, teacher, or older sibling. Maybe you went to a story hour at the library and sat down with the other kids and listened. If you had siblings, maybe mom got you together to listen to a bedtime story (with the toddler interrupting every few seconds, naturally).

Reading begins as a collective experience. It’s share. My four youngest children are currently used to listening to audiobooks in their playrooms. They sit there, all together, and listen quietly for hours.

Once we learn to read, most of our reading becomes an individual experience, something you do quietly on your own. Maybe we sometimes read aloud for a class or for our own kids like our parents did for us, but adults really don’t just sit and listen to audiobooks together.

The theory is, however, thatIn the past, adults were much more sociable when it came to reading. In ancient culture, perhaps because literacy rates were lower and physical copies of books much rarer, reading aloud was much more common. It was not uncommon for a group of people to gather in a public square to collectively listen to a read book.

Saint Augustine, in his Confession, comments on how the way people read began to change over the course of her life. As a young man, he met Saint Ambrose, bishop of Milan and well-known intellectual. Augustine sought out Ambrose as a mentor and regularly visited the bishop’s office for advice.

Rather early, Augustine noticed something interesting about the older man, who often read a book when his young protégé entered the room. He writes: “When he read his eyes scanned the page and his heart searched for meaning, but his voice was silent and his tongue was still… for he never read aloud.

Augustine mentions this because it was unusual. It was a new development that a person could put words directly into their mind without any outside sound or movement. Her lips didn’t even move to utter the words, but “Her eyes scanned the page and her heart searched for meaning.”

As reading moved away from groups and became an individual activity, some historians believe that reading the change helped develop a robust inner life. In A story of reading, writes Alberto Manguel: “The words… could exist in the interior space, hastened or barely begun, entirely deciphered or barely spoken, while the reader’s mind inspected them at leisure, drawing new notions, allowing comparisons memory or other books left open for simultaneous reading.

This ability to ponder the words carefully and at an individual pace was an important spiritual development as it enabled a new type of Bible study. Ambrose was known to have taken Scripture to his heart and meditating on it deeply. He had a new method, which was already starting to gain popularity in the East, which he helped introduce to the Western world. It is called lectio divina.

Lectio divina is an attitude of prayerful listening. It involves quietly dwelling on a few interesting words and pondering them, allowing God to speak through them in new ways. As Ambrose practiced, he clearly bore great fruit in the wisdom and power of his preaching.

If we were to practice daily lectio divina, what would we hear? It seems to me that prayerful listening can be practiced in any area of ​​our life, not just reading a text, and that we could all flourish with much more. With each Advent we are encouraged to slow down and listen more, not only with silent reading, but also with quiet time, prayer, attention to beauty, and time with family. It’s an opportunity I’m grateful for, this reminder to keep the noise out of my ears to listen and to focus on what is really important.


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Best Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics Books https://holy-bibles.org/best-physics-chemistry-mathematics-books/ Sat, 04 Dec 2021 11:23:23 +0000 https://holy-bibles.org/best-physics-chemistry-mathematics-books/ Best books for JEE Main Physics, Chemistry, Maths (representational) Image Credit: Shutterstock Choosing the best books is an important part of the main preparation for JEE. When it comes to the selection of books, aspirants have many options available. Applicants should keep in mind that NCERT Classes 11 and 12 textbooks are like the Bible […]]]>

Best books for JEE Main Physics, Chemistry, Maths (representational)

Image Credit: Shutterstock

Choosing the best books is an important part of the main preparation for JEE. When it comes to the selection of books, aspirants have many options available. Applicants should keep in mind that NCERT Classes 11 and 12 textbooks are like the Bible for each subject. NCERTs are the primary books for clarifying basic concepts. Students also need other reference books for in-depth knowledge and question practice to score well on the JEE main exam.

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JEE Main is considered to be one of the most competitive engineering entrance exams and students should know the names of good books to become familiar with the exam pattern, level of questions, and know the strategies for answering questions. asked during the exam. Also, practice JEE Main questions from the previous year and trying mock tests is essential for candidates to improve speed and accuracy.

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Best books for JEE Main Physics

S. No

Name of the book and author

The book will be better for

1

Concepts of Physics (Vol. 1 and 2) by HC Verma

Quality issues on all subjects

2.

Foundations of Physics by Halliday, Resnick & Walker

Concepts of all topics

3.

Understanding Physics by DC Pandey (Arihant Publications): Set of books for

  • Electricity & Magnetism

  • Mechanics (Vol. 1 & 2)

  • Modern Optics & Physics

  • Waves & Thermodynamics

Explanation, derivation, and set of questions about resolved / unresolved quality issues

4.

General Physics Problems by IE Irodov

Practice problems

5.

Understanding Physics by Freedman and Young

Explanation, theory of all subjects

6.

Problems in Physics by SS Krotov

Practice problems

7.

Problems and Solution of Physics by Shashi Bhushan Tiwari

To practice problems and study detailed solutions.

Best Books for JEE Major Chemistry

S. No

Name of the book and author

The book will be better for

1.

NCERT manuals (for classes XI and XII)

Many questions are asked directly from the NCERT manual

2.

Modern approach to chemical calculations by RC Mukherjee

To practice solving physicochemical numbers

3.

Organic Chemistry by OP Tandon

Good explanation of topics

4.

Concept of physical chemistry by P Bahadur

Good explanation and set of quality issues

5.

Concise Inorganic Chemistry by JD Lee

Good reference book on inorganic chemistry

6.

Physical chemistry by PW Atkins

Refer to this book once you are done with the above books or want to practice more

7.

Organic chemistry by Morrison & Boyd

Refer to this book once you are done with the above books or want to practice more

Best Books for JEE Main Mathematics

S. No

Name of the book and author

The book will be better for

1.

Objective mathematics by RD Sharma

Basics of each topic

2.

Plane trigonometry by SL Loney

Trigonometry

3.

Elements of Coordinate Geometry by SL Loney

Coordinate geometry

4.

Algebra by Dr SK Goyal Arihant Publications

Algebra

5.

Play with Graphics by Amit M Agarwal (Arihant Publications)

To solve problems

6.

Differential calculus by Amit M Agarwal (Arihant Publications)

Calculation

7.

Integral calculus by Amit M Agarwal (Arihant Publications)

Calculation

8.

Complete Mathematics for JEE Main TMH

For the explanation of the subjects


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Awakened children’s books pushed everything else off the shelves https://holy-bibles.org/awakened-childrens-books-pushed-everything-else-off-the-shelves/ Sat, 04 Dec 2021 06:00:00 +0000 https://holy-bibles.org/awakened-childrens-books-pushed-everything-else-off-the-shelves/ All I wanted was a book to explain the history of Chanukah to children. Was it so much to ask? I know Judaism is a small religion in this country, but I had been to a very big bookstore. The children’s section took up most of the second floor. An entire library was devoted to […]]]>

All I wanted was a book to explain the history of Chanukah to children. Was it so much to ask? I know Judaism is a small religion in this country, but I had been to a very big bookstore.

The children’s section took up most of the second floor. An entire library was devoted to the Gruffalo, one to the Hungry Caterpillar, and another to Dr. Seuss. Fair enough. Then I found the reference books. As you might expect, it was full of dinosaurs, animals, nature, anatomy, and maps. Most of it, however, has been devoted to politics.

It was not labeled as such, perhaps because the Conservatives did not recognize that was what it was. There was a section of biographies of people who were clearly meant to be role models. Several were uncontroversial – Albert Einstein, Martin Luther King, Rosalind Franklin – even though the text inside was a load of poorly written slag.

But among them were texts about the life of former U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Vice President Kamala Harris, whose primary qualification for inclusion appeared to be that they were women, Americans and leftists. What has this to do with the interests or educational needs of a normal British child, I couldn’t tell you.

Then there was what I’ll call the Greta Thunberg section. You can buy seemingly countless hagiographies of the Swedish teenager, as well as a variety of books explaining why children should become activists because “silence is not an option!” There were books about the “heroes” of the NHS, a deeply irritating shelf of cod feminism with titles like Rebel Stories for Rebel Girls and books praising Black Lives Matter.

There was a book which I think must have escaped the fiction section, but which could have made a good political tome, called Calm down, Boris! (Blurb: “Boris is a very endearing monster. If only he hadn’t gotten carried away …”)

And then on the floor, occupying a modest half-shelf, I found the books on religion: a few children’s Bibles, a book on Islam and a few Christmas stories. That was it.

An assistant searched the store – Hatchard’s on Piccadilly – and all surrounding Waterstones stores, including the nearby 200,000-pound, five-story Monster branch. If I wanted a children’s book on recent political fad, I was in luck.

As for the Hanukkah books, they had several, she found, but they sold out. Since there is a demand, they might be able to restock one, if the child indoctrination section has room. It’s just an idea.

I couldn’t help but feel that my visit to the bookstore was part of a scheme in which we subject the most vulnerable and impressionable part of society to our most radical experiences.

Comic book crusade ideology, unnecessary vaccination of adolescents, and compulsory masks in schools when not required in offices or bars: these things speak of a civilization with unhealthy neuroses and without the will or power. common sense to protect our children.

The promoters of this sort of thing are probably fooling themselves into thinking that they are passing a sense of responsibility on to the next generation. What they are really doing is using children as a dumping ground for all their guilt and fear. But the kids don’t vote, so it doesn’t matter.


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Children’s books focus on charity, the joy of Christmas https://holy-bibles.org/childrens-books-focus-on-charity-the-joy-of-christmas/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 20:34:00 +0000 https://holy-bibles.org/childrens-books-focus-on-charity-the-joy-of-christmas/ The following books are suitable for Christmas gifts: “The Night the Saints Saved Christmas” by Gracie Jagla, illustrated by Michael Corsini. Our Sunday Visitor (Huntington, Indiana, 2021). 28 pages, $ 16.95. Whimsical, clever and silly, “The Night the Saints Saved Christmas” will leave readers rooting for a heroic community of Saints who have all come […]]]>

The following books are suitable for Christmas gifts:

“The Night the Saints Saved Christmas” by Gracie Jagla, illustrated by Michael Corsini. Our Sunday Visitor (Huntington, Indiana, 2021). 28 pages, $ 16.95.

Whimsical, clever and silly, “The Night the Saints Saved Christmas” will leave readers rooting for a heroic community of Saints who have all come together to help a bedridden Saint Nicholas.

Using their unique strengths and regional knowledge, recognizable Saints tackle the enormous and now potentially perilous task of delivering gifts to children around the world. Saint Joan of Arc carries her load on horseback while Saint John Paul II balances his bundle on skis to save the day.

Every saint’s selfless and joyful contribution to saving Christmas is an important reminder to readers that a Christmas present is a symbol of God’s grace. A beautiful story with a sweet message for Catholic children, this rhyming book will be enjoyed year after year. 5 years and over.

“La Joie d’Ephraim” by Madeleine Carroll, illustrated by Randy Friemel. Isaiah Books (Little Bookham, UK, 2021). 28 pages, $ 16.05.

Catholic children’s book author Madeleine Carroll has once again written a book with prose so soft and soothing it almost reads like a lullaby. Illustrated with beautiful original scenes in oil, “The Joy of Ephraim” combines the parable of the lost sheep with the story of the Nativity.

Pleasant for adults and children alike, this book lends itself naturally to a reading and a discussion of the Gospel of Luke. The two Bible stories that inspire the story are included to help facilitate reflection. 4-8 years old.

“The Beggar and the Blue Bird” by Anthony DeStefano, illustrated by Richard Cowdrey. Sophia Institute Press (Manchester, New Hampshire, 2021). 32 pages, $ 16.95.

Those who appreciate Oscar Wilde’s “The Happy Prince” will find “The Beggar and the Blue Bird” a charming picture book that is memorable if not a little predictable. Loaded with themes highlighting altruism and charity, this book will leave readers a little sad but hopeful.

Set in a snowy, urban Christmas season, the book is a fitting addition to author Anthony DeStefano’s long list of poignant children’s books. 5-10 years.

“Joseph’s Donkey” by Anthony DeStefano, illustrated by Juliana Kolesova. Sophia Institute Press (Manchester, New Hampshire, 2021). 40 pages, $ 16.95.

Even the most stoic reader can’t help but cry just a little bit after reading “Joseph’s Donkey,” another perfectly sweet children’s book by Anthony DeStefano. It is the story of a life of humble donkey work and devotion to the Holy Family.

Told in simple rhymes, the book is beautifully illustrated with soft and lifelike images. Adults and children alike will fall in love with this gentle workhorse and the family it serves. 5 years and over.

“The treasure with a face” by Janeen Zaio. Perpetual Light Publishing (Columbus, Ohio 2021). 269 ​​pages, $ 12.69.

“The treasure with a face” is a rare find. Exciting adventures, humorous dialogue, and identifiable characters help make this book gripping and informative for upper elementary and middle school readers.

It’s the story of a precocious but clumsy 12-year-old apprentice tasked by his uncle demanding to travel over 100 miles to deliver a precious package.

Although determined to accomplish this mission, the preteen is also eager to simultaneously pursue his passion: treasure hunting. The journey along the way is dangerous and thrilling, but ultimately leads to what it was meant to find: the true treasure of the Catholic faith. 9-12 years old.

“The Wordless Weaver” by Claudia Cangilla McAdam, illustrated by Caroline Baker Mazure. Our Sunday Visitor (Huntington, Indiana, 2021). 36 pages, $ 16.95.

Set during the Lent season, “The Wordless Weaver” deserves to be included as appropriate for Christmas gifts and as meaningful all year round. This is the story of young Shira, a talented weaver born silent.

Unable to welcome Jesus on Palm Sunday with the same verbal greetings as his fellow citizens in Jerusalem, Shira decided to praise him by offering him what she could: his handmade shroud.

This imaginative fictional tale tells the origin of the Shroud of Turin that will leave readers hopeful, joyful and grateful for the talents given by God. 6-10 years old.

“Saint Joseph: watch over my family” by Sabine du Mesnil, illustrated by Henjing Zang. Magnificat (New York, 2021). 56 pages, $ 13.99.

This lovely children’s book will help readers understand Saint Joseph on a new and deeper level. The life of this man of few words is explored with passages from the Bible, stories and prayers.

“Saint Joseph” highlights the inspiring characteristics of this faithful and devoted husband and father, and even includes some modern day miraculous stories that provide a glimpse into his good-humored nature. 7-10 years old.

“Sacred Scripture” by Michael R. Heinlein, illustrated by Frank Fraser. Our Sunday Visitor (Huntington, Indiana, 2021). 24 pages, $ 12.95.

One of four hardback books by author Michael R. Heinlein and the Teeny Tiny Theology series by illustrator Frank Fraser, “Sacred Writing” contains plenty of church history and Bible studies in just a few pages. solid.

Brightly illustrated with engaging images and text, readers will learn key points from God’s word through a brief overview of key stories, poetry, and teachings from the Bible.

Along with “Sacred Scriptures,” “The Trinity,” “The Story of Salvation” and “Christology” are included in the Teeny Tiny Theology series. 4-8 years old.

– – –

Lordan, a mother of three, has an MA in Education and Political Science and is a former Associate International Editor of the Catholic News Service. She currently teaches and is a court appointed lawyer for foster children.


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What Leonard Cohen Achieved By Fighting Against Religion | Books https://holy-bibles.org/what-leonard-cohen-achieved-by-fighting-against-religion-books/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 12:00:00 +0000 https://holy-bibles.org/what-leonard-cohen-achieved-by-fighting-against-religion-books/ LEONARD COHEN: THE MYSTICAL ROOTS OF GENIUS by Harry Freedman, Bloomsbury Continuum, 288 pages, $ 28 Have you ever thought that a book should be an essay, an essay, a paragraph, a paragraph, a sentence? This is not quite the case with Harry Freedman Leonard Cohen: The Mystical Roots of Genius, a guided tour of […]]]>

LEONARD COHEN: THE MYSTICAL ROOTS OF GENIUS by Harry Freedman, Bloomsbury Continuum, 288 pages, $ 28

Have you ever thought that a book should be an essay, an essay, a paragraph, a paragraph, a sentence? This is not quite the case with Harry Freedman Leonard Cohen: The Mystical Roots of Genius, a guided tour of the various spiritual influences of the singer-songwriter. But it is one of those good books which, despite its charms, would have been even better after a small operation.

Cohen’s grandfather was a rabbi, and Cohen grew up in the heart of Montreal’s Jewish community. It is therefore not surprising that his art is inspired by the Hebrew Bible (or the Old Testament); the Talmud, this repository in several volumes of Jewish law and customs, legend and folklore; and the commentary on the Hebrew scriptures known as Midrash. More importantly, it was inspired by Kabbalah, a mystical tradition that rose to greater popular interest early in this century after being adopted by Madonna and other celebrities.

Every true artist is eclectic, so like his contemporary Bob Dylan, Cohen also drew inspiration from Christian sources, most notably in “Suzanne”, which in many ways is a musical rewrite of the life of Jesus. But as Dylan changed his name from Robert Allen Zimmerman, Cohen was almost defiantly true to his decidedly Jewish identity. He once told a curious interviewer that, yes, he had considered changing his name – to “September” – and when she asked him if he meant “Leonard September” he said: “No! September! Cohen.

Nonetheless, he grew up to think that synagogical Judaism was fossilized and mechanical, and he defined himself in a 1967 interview as “a priest of a catacomb religion that is underground, just beginning.”

Cohen spent three years in a Zen monastery in California and was ordained a Zen monk, but as Freedman points out, Zen is more of a way of looking at the world than a belief system and a set of rules like Judaism. The poems of Federico García Lorca have much more impact on his writing. Young Cohen wanted to be known for his poetry more than anything else. He says that the Spanish poet “dragged me into the racket of poetry”, that he “educated me”, as did the medieval Persian poet Rumi and three of Cohen’s Canadian contemporaries: the poets Irving Layton, Louis Dudek and AM Klein.

Yet nothing, as Freedman rightly observes, shaped Cohen’s art more than the key idea of ​​Kabbalah: that “something went wrong when the world was created, leaving divine sparks scattered over the earth, embers and restored to their rightful place. God, Cohen said, was fragmented. “Creation is a catastrophe,” in Cohen’s words, and “there are pieces of him, or her, or her, which are everywhere, in fact, and the specific task of the Jew is to mend the face of God. . “

You see this in a song like “The Story of Isaac,” which is based on the biblical account of Abraham preparing to sacrifice his son Isaac at the command of God. God, of course, provides a lamb for the offering and spares Isaac. But how do you make sense of such a horrible plan while clinging to your faith? Not by logic, of course, but by art. Cohen changed the point of view of the story, added his own points of view and perhaps drew, says Freedman, a fable by Aesop that “found its place in Korean folklore” and perhaps was discovered by Cohen during his stay in the Zen monastery.

Or he might not have used that fable at all, says Freedman. Maybe he just did what creators always did, be they poets, songwriters or Hebrew scribes, that is, telling the great stories that spring from the dark recesses of the mind and find their way to the heart of each culture. Cohen didn’t borrow so much from the Old Testament as he echoed it, spinning his version of stories that we never tire of running through our minds.

Wouldn’t all of this make a great try? Freedman is a widely published Judaic and Aramaic scholar whose book is packed with insight, but most of it is song-by-song commentary that is interspersed with many valuable observations. Cohen and Freedman both have a lot to say, but the scattered approach makes it difficult to identify them.

The content of this book is great, in other words. It’s the delivery system that could have taken a bit of work. ??


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Books of the year 2021 https://holy-bibles.org/books-of-the-year-2021/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 06:48:51 +0000 https://holy-bibles.org/books-of-the-year-2021/ Andrew is a teaching pastor at King’s Church, London, and graduated in History and Theology from Cambridge (MA) and King’s College London (PhD). He is a writer for THINK Theology (thinktheology.co.uk), where was this blog first publication. One of the lock’s silver liners – and if you’re a tactile, outgoing pastor there weren’t many – […]]]>

Andrew is a teaching pastor at King’s Church, London, and graduated in History and Theology from Cambridge (MA) and King’s College London (PhD). He is a writer for THINK Theology (thinktheology.co.uk), where was this blog first publication.

One of the lock’s silver liners – and if you’re a tactile, outgoing pastor there weren’t many – was getting to read a lot of wonderful books this year. Many of them were related to my work in 1776 and the origins of the post-Christian West, which means that some of these titles may turn out to be more interesting to me than most people. (It also explains why so many of them were published by Princeton University Press, which has an incredibly good line in thoughtful and comprehensive historical books.) But there were also many that were theological, devotional, fictional, scientific, or just plain fun. Here are my top ten followed by all the others, many of which are also excellent.

Top ten recent books

Ritchie Robertson, The Enlightenment: The Pursuit of Happiness, 1680-1790. A masterful study of the century or so that made the modern West. Astonishing in its breadth, erudition and clarity.

Richard Bauckham, Who is god? Key moments in biblical revelation. One of the most uplifting books of the year, without even trying to be, is Bauckham in great shape.

Tish Harrison Warren, Prayer in the night. A beautifully written and pastorally wise account of a prayer you may not know, but probably should know. Honest, refreshing and happy.

Walter Scheidel, Escape From Rome: The Failure Of The Empire And The Road To Prosperity. A bold claim – that European success was due to the collapse of the Roman Empire and the failure of its successors – brilliantly defended.

John Piper, Providence. Piper’s best book since God’s pleasures, in my opinion, filled with spiritual enrichment and fuel of joy extracted from the most unlikely places.

Donna Tartt, the goldfinch. A wonderful story, superbly told (it’s Donna Tartt, after all), with a deeply deep meditation on motivation, self-expression, and following your heart to the end.

Dan Jones, Powers and thrones: a new story from the Middle Ages. It is amazing that you can describe a thousand years of history (often opaque and distorted) in such a clear, vivid and entertaining way as this one. Book of the year.

Marc Morris, The Anglo-Saxons: A History of Early England. Part narrative, part origin story, part archaeological detective, this is an exceptional tale of a period that very few people (including me) understand. Marvellous.

Rebecca McLaughlin, Ten Questions Every Teenager Should Ask (And Answer) About Christianity. Apologetic for Teens that actually works for everyone and channels some of Rebecca’s other work into an even more accessible format.

Benjamin and Jenna Silber upstairs, Why We’re Restless: In the Modern Quest for Contentment. A remarkable deep and subtle apologetics, drawing on Montaigne, Pascal, Rousseau and Tocqueville to illuminate our quest for happiness.

The ten best old books

Leo Tolstoy, Master and man. Oh, being able to write sentences and tell stories like Tolstoy. What an end.

Marie Shelley, Frankenstein. Much more human, compassionate and insightful than I expected. The new edition of Karen Swallow Prior is cracking.

Nikolai Gogol, The nose. A man wakes up without a nose and later sees him walking down the street dressed as a senior official. Weird, short and hilarious.

Shusaku Endo, Silence. Fast-paced, captivating, haunting and deeply stimulating, this is one of the best examples of twentieth-century Christian creativity.

Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, The Communist Manifesto. As Sam Seaborn so aptly put it: “Don’t you think a Communist ever wrote an elegant sentence?” How do you think they got everyone to be a Communist? “

Adam Smith, An inquiry into the nature and causes of the wealth of nations. I never realized how much this was about “nature” and not just the “causes” of wealth, nor how convincing it was.

TS Eliot, The idea of ​​a Christian society. I should have read this by now, but now that I did, I’m glad I did.

Augustine, Confessions (tr. Sarah Ruden). Augustine doesn’t need to be introduced, but Ruden’s translation makes a masterpiece even fresher, richer, and more urgent.

Cicero, On old age. In short, inquisitive and strangely contemporary, given that it was written two millennia ago.

Gregory of Nyssa, On not three gods. The thoroughness and thoughtfulness here are typical of Gregory, and not very typical of most modern writers, so it’s worth reading.

The rest

Michael Wood, The history of China: portrait of a civilization and its people
David French, Divided We Fall: America’s Threat of Secession and How to Restore Our Nation
Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Musings of a lonely walker
Ben Wilson, Metropolis: A Story of Mankind’s Greatest Invention
Pierre Gay, The Enlightenment: The Rise of Modern Paganism
Immanuel Kant, What is Enlightenment?
Gotthold Ephraim Lessing, The education of the human race
Anthony Doerr, All the light that we can’t see
Leo Damrosch, The club: Johnson, Boswell and the friends who shaped an age
Jean le Rond d’Alembert, Preliminary speech to Diderot’s Encyclopedia
Bessel van der Kolk, The body keeps the score: the mind, the brain and the body in the transformation of the trauma
Seb Falk, The Light Ages: A Medieval Journey of Discovery
DA Carson, The God Who Is There: Finding Your Place in God’s History
Roger Scruton, Kant: a very short introduction
British Bennett, The half that faints
Hugh Aldersey-Williams, Dutch Light: Christiaan Huygens and the factory of science in Europe
George Saunders, A swim in the pond in the rain
Emily St John Mandel, Eleven station
Sven Beckert, Empire of Cotton: A New History of Global Capitalism
Guillaume Rosen, The most powerful idea in the world: a story of steam, industry and invention
Eric Hobsbawm, Industry and Empire
TS Eliot, Four quartets
Francois Spufford, Perpetual light
Joseph Priestley, Instructions for impregnating water with fixed air
Priya Satia, Empire of Guns: the violent fabrication of the industrial revolution
Prasannan Parthasarathi, Why Europe Got Rich and Asia Not: Global Economic Divergence, 1600-1850
Bobby Jamieson, The Path to Becoming a Pastor: A Guide for Aspirants
Herman Bavinck, The Doctrine of God
Harold Senkbeil, Christ and the calamity
Marguerite Jacob, The first knowledge economy: human capital and the European economy, 1750-1850
John Adams, Thoughts on government
Bradley Thompson, America’s Revolutionary Spirit: A Moral History of the American Revolution and the Declaration that Defined It
Abigail Dean, Girl A
John Webster, Christ our salvation: exhibits and proclamations
Andy McCullough, The story of Bethlehem: mission and justice on the fringes of the world
Hilaire Belloc, The modern traveler
Simone Weil, An anthology
Juan Mascaro, The Upanishads
Joël Mokyr, A Culture of Growth: The Origins of the Modern Economy
Daron Acemoglu and James Robinson, Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity and Poverty
Richard Osman, The Thursday Murder Club
Anne Robert Jacques Turgot, Reflections on the formation and distribution of wealth
Ronald Findlay and Kevin O’Rourke, Power and Abundance: Trade, War, and the Global Economy in the Second Millennium
Peter Leithart, Baptism: a guide to the afterlife
Tom Schreiner, Hebrews
Gregory Clark, A Farewell to Alms: A Brief Economic History of the World
Bill Bryson, A walk in the woods
Ben Myers, The Apostles’ Creed for all the children of God
David Stasavage, The Decline and Fall of Modern Democracy: A Global History from Antiquity to the Present Day
Michael Reeves, Rejoice and tremble: the surprising good news of the fear of the Lord
Philippe Hoffmann, Why has Europe conquered the world?
Daniel Darling (ed.), Ministers of Reconciliation: Preaching on Race and the Gospel
Daron Acemoglu and James Robinson, The Narrow Hall: How Nations Struggle for Freedom
Nathan Hill, The Nix
Eric Mason (ed.), Urban apologetics: restoring black dignity with the Gospel
Daniel Kehlmann, Tyll
Hannah More, Florio: a poetic tale for handsome gentlemen and beautiful ladies
Sergio Cariello, The action bible
Adrien Wooldridge, The Aristocracy of Talent: How Meritocracy Made the Modern World
John Cartwright, Make your choice
Catherine Ostler, The Duchess Countess: the woman who scandalized a nation
Samuel Johnson, Taxation No Tyranny: A Response to Resolutions and Address of the United States Congress
Jonathan Israel, Democratic Enlightenment: Philosophy, Revolution and Human Rights 1750-1790
Alexander Radishchev, Freedom
Thomas day, Fragment of an original letter on the slavery of negroes
Andrew Bunt, Non-pronouns: reflections on the transgender experience
Peter Leithart, The promise of his appearance: an exhibition of 2 Peter
Ron Chernow, Washington: a life
Judith Sargent Murray, Gender equality
David Hackett Fischer, Washington crossing
David McCullough, John adams
Gordon Wood, Revolutionary characters: what made the founders different
CS Lewis, The Magician’s Nephew
Jonathan Israel, The Expanding Blaze: How the American Revolution Set the World on Fire, 1775-1848
Paula Hawkins, The girl on the train
Seth David Radwell, American Schism: How the Two Enlightenment Holds the Secret to Our Nation’s Healing
Danish Ortlund, Sweet and humble: The Heart of Christ for sinners and the suffering
Charles Taylor, A secular age
Jackie Hill Perry, Holier Than You: How God’s Holiness Helps Us to Trust Him
Ben Macintyre, Spy Among Friends: Kim Philby and the Great Betrayal
Hans Boersma, Five things theologians want Bible scholars to know
Denis Diderot, Interview of a philosopher with the marshal of ***
Katherine Sonderegger, Systematic Theology: The Doctrine of God
Marquis de Sade, Dialogue between a priest and a dying man
Scott Swain, The Trinity and the Bible: on theological interpretation
Elizabeth Day, Magpie
Sinclair Ferguson, The dawn of redemptive grace
CS Lewis, The horse and his boy

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Books for Holiday Gifts, Part 2 https://holy-bibles.org/books-for-holiday-gifts-part-2/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 19:20:39 +0000 https://holy-bibles.org/books-for-holiday-gifts-part-2/ Part two of Andrea Kirsh’s annual roundup of the best art books is here, and includes two intriguing selections, one on abstract art and the second on counterfeits and hoaxes in the world of art. ‘art! Andrea says these books are perfect for those interested in 20th and 21st century abstraction and for those who […]]]>

Part two of Andrea Kirsh’s annual roundup of the best art books is here, and includes two intriguing selections, one on abstract art and the second on counterfeits and hoaxes in the world of art. ‘art! Andrea says these books are perfect for those interested in 20th and 21st century abstraction and for those who enjoy mysteries or detective stories. Be sure to check out “Holiday Books Part 1” if you missed it!

Pepe Karmel “Abstract Art: A World History” (2020)

Cover of the book, Pepe Karmel “Abstract Art: A Global History” (Thames and Hudson, London: 2020) ISBN 978-0-500-23958-2. Courtesy of Thames and Hudson.

This carefully designed and beautifully produced book offers an original and valuable way to approach the abstraction of the 20th and 21st centuries. It is written in an engaging manner that speaks to the author’s long teaching experience. Rather than tracing abstraction as a successive progression of renunciation, he traces its origins in many subjects that artists have always addressed. Karmel begins: “Abstract art is always rooted in the real world experience…. the true history of abstract art is not just a story of formal innovations; abstract art also offers a series of responses to social, political and cultural changes. It covers a range of sources under the headings of bodies, landscapes, cosmologies, architectures and signs and motifs. The book opens with a thoughtful introduction to abstraction that includes the evolution of critical approaches to the subject. Short essays explain how the artists approach each of the proposed sources, but most of the book is devoted to several hundred examples, each discussed and illustrated by full-page color plates.

Karmel points out that he is not proposing a new canon, but opens the discussion. Nor does it create a comprehensive history of abstraction. It takes a post-colonial approach that examines the specifics of each artist’s situation as well as the ideas they have in common, and pays equal attention to the work of trained and untrained artists. One of the challenges in understanding abstraction is that many of its implications are easily lost when works leave their original territory. Similar formal means have expressed a wide variety of ideas, and forms that had been well established in Europe or the United States may be both radical and timely elsewhere. While Karmel’s examples are skewed toward the New York collections (academics never have a global travel budget), the artwork is deeply international, and the volume includes many artists who had not been previously considered by mainstream writers and publishers. This book will be invaluable to the general public and to students, and the diversity of the examples will also make it interesting for many specialist readers.

In the section on Inspirational Map and Graphics Art, Karmel discusses Kathleen Petyarre (Australia, circa 1938-2018) and her choice to paint in acrylics after the medium was introduced by a teacher who worked in its native community of Utopia; Petyarre had become allergic to the dyes she used for textiles, so she switched to painting. Its designs came from family legends, the local landscape and wildlife, and its dot language came from the traditional body painting of its community used in ceremonies. A spare woodcut by Zarina (India / US, 1937-2020) consists of a single line that winds diagonally across an open plan. Its form is the line drawn to separate India and Pakistan in 1947, which created massive exile and bloody consequences; armed conflict and exile were central topics for Zarina’s work. Mark Bradford (United States, b.1961) found the first materials for his collages in the rolling papers at his mother’s beauty salon, then on the streets of his neighborhood in Los Angeles. Its forms reflect city plans and their demographic markings, and its subjects include the evolution of inner-city communities and their oversight by government and police.

Pepe Karmel “Abstract Art: A Global History” (Thames and Hudson, London: 2020)
ISBN 9780500239582. Thames and Hudson | Librairie.org

Antoinette LaFarge “Sting in the Tale: Art, Hoax and Provocation” (2021)

Book cover, "Sting in the Tale: art, hoax and provocation" by Antoinette LaFarge, with a photo of a crumpled red satin fabric with faded flowers on top.
Cover of the book, Antoinette LaFarge “Sting in the Tale: Art, Hoax and Provocation (Doppelhouse Press, Los Angeles: 2021) ISBN 978-1-7339579-5-3. Courtesy of Doppelhouse Press

Antoinette LaFarge is interested in forgeries, hoaxes and deceptions, and this book will appeal to readers who enjoy detective stories and mysteries as well as anyone who enjoys good stories, although many of these LaFarge tales are of a questionable veracity. His subjects include photographs of fairies, A field guide to surreal botany, the skeleton of a centaur, and a host of unlikely organizations such as the Coney Island Amateur Psychoanalytic Society and the Society for Nebulous Knowledge, and research projects including the Speculative dinosaur project and the Institute of Militronics and Advanced Temporal Intervention. His research spans from the classical period to the present day.

LaFarge explores a range of what she calls “fictional art” that developed since the 1960s and expanded in the 1980s. The works have not gained attention as a genre and employ various formats. All involve deception, with the artist often playing a role in verifying the fiction as well as producing artifacts that reinforce the story. Some invent artists or other characters, others claim scientific discoveries (fictitious zoology, paleontology, archeology), or even institutions, associations, movements and even nations. By exploring fictional art, she is interested in works rarely considered in relation to one another. These include the “Museum of Modern Art, Department of Eagles” by Marcel Broodthaers (Museum of Modern Art, Department of Eagles), performances by Andrea Fraser as a museum guide, projects by Walid Raad of “The Atlas Group” and the “Museum of Jurassic Technology.

A paradigmatic work is Beauvais Lyon’s “Association de zoologiecrive”, founded in 1908, says Lyons, and devoted to the “zoomorphic junction” – the idea that unrelated species could produce offspring – as opposed to the Darwinian evolution. Lyons backs up the story with biblical quotes and taxidermic specimens of “divine collage”: a raccoon crow, a groundhogfish and a gorilla hen as well as lithographs which are heartwarming in their resemblance to 19th century scientific illustrations . He showed the work at the annual John Scopes Trial Festival in Dayton, Tennessee, where it attracts responses from Darwin supporters and opponents.

Spades in the tale is a serious study by an scholar and practitioner, but LaFarge’s examples encompass such an intriguing spectrum that the book will pique the curiosity of many culturally curious readers. It will certainly be of interest to artists and others concerned with questions of the ethical obligations of artists to their audiences, the authority of museums to establish artefacts as art and verify their authenticity, the role of educational institutions in the production of official stories and the possibilities of art as cultural criticism.

Antoinette LaFarge “Sting in the Tale: Art, Hoax and Provocation” (Doppelhouse Press, Los Angeles: 2021) ISBN 9781733957953. Doppelhouse press | Librairie.org

Be sure to check out “Holiday Books Part 1”!

Print of a fictional archaeological work of art of an Egyptian style cat riding a woman whose arms and legs are wrapped around the cat.
Beauvais Lyons Codex Création Apasht Plate VII, a 1982 lithograph of a bas-relief fragment. Image courtesy of the Hokes Archives.


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Recent Books in Brief – The Irish Catholic https://holy-bibles.org/recent-books-in-brief-the-irish-catholic/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 07:02:39 +0000 https://holy-bibles.org/recent-books-in-brief-the-irish-catholic/ My words will not pass by Father Martin Hogan (Messenger Publications, € 19.95 / £ 18.95) Father Martin Hogan taught New Testament studies at Mater Dei in Dublin and had written five previous books on reflections for the liturgical years. These comments allow readers to enjoy a period of reflection at their own pace, memories […]]]>
My words will not pass

by Father Martin Hogan (Messenger Publications, € 19.95 / £ 18.95)

Father Martin Hogan taught New Testament studies at Mater Dei in Dublin and had written five previous books on reflections for the liturgical years. These comments allow readers to enjoy a period of reflection at their own pace, memories that may not always be possible to have for a long time at Mass.

The inspiring theme of this volume comes from this passage in Luke where we are told “Heaven and earth will pass away, but my words will not pass away”.

There was a time when those words could sound hyperbolic. But these days, with Covid-19 and climate change, the possibility that the earth as we know it will cease to exist is very real. People’s minds are more focused. The message is that although everything else changes around the words of Scripture, don’t stop shining with light when everything darkens, like a lighthouse or a morning star.

The Deep End A journey with the Sunday Gospels in the year of Luke

by Tríona Doherty and Jane Mellett (Messenger Publications, € 14.95 / € 12.95)

Unlike the book above, this volume of reflections on the same liturgical year takes a different approach. The authors say their aim is to highlight “the role of women in the story of Jesus” as well as to engage with the “ecological climate we face in the 21st century” at the same time.

So it is in its own way a stimulating book that asks its readers to confront the world as it is and to come up with an appropriate spiritual approach to embrace things as they really are.

But the book is designed for easy reading and to inspire thought through additional ideas from people ranging from Pope Francis to Martin Luther King Jr. Many will find this book accessible and effective.

No room at the hostel: read the Bible today

by Tom Higgins (published by author, available on Amazon and other sites, € 24.95 / £ 21.99)

The author understands this book “as a commentary on the Bible.

“It aims to show that the Bible is as relevant today as when it was written for an ancient audience. Rather than being strictly academic, the purpose of the book is devotional and inspiring. It is primarily intended for lay readers.

However, no book should be an end in itself. The author would have made his commentary more accessible if he had included some sort of notes or bibliography, so that his readers could delve into particular aspects of the Old and New Testaments. Only in this way could he have fully realized his objective of opening the text to readers. However, its approach is cautious and conservative, so it is unlikely to lead them astray and as such will please and help many readers who seek Biblical inspiration to inform their actions and help them in their daily lives.


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Local authors organize book signings December 11 | Books https://holy-bibles.org/local-authors-organize-book-signings-december-11-books/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://holy-bibles.org/local-authors-organize-book-signings-december-11-books/ A book signing by two local writers will be held at the newly renovated Fountain Hills Community Center on Saturday, December 11. Rosemarie Malroy and Effie-Alean Gross invite friends, neighbors, students, teachers, veterans, associates and winter visitors to share their love of reading and writing. They each celebrate the release of their fiction and non-fiction […]]]>

A book signing by two local writers will be held at the newly renovated Fountain Hills Community Center on Saturday, December 11. Rosemarie Malroy and Effie-Alean Gross invite friends, neighbors, students, teachers, veterans, associates and winter visitors to share their love of reading and writing. They each celebrate the release of their fiction and non-fiction books.

Malroy’s “Forever Loving” is a Christian love story that takes place during the American Revolutionary War with the two divided groups: the Tories, loyal to England, and the Whigs, loyal to the American colonies. Research into Malroy’s family ancestry brought surprising discoveries and fueled the imagination of his novel.

In contrast, Gross publishes three non-fiction books, including “Hillbilly He’ven”, “Ecclesiastes: Sonnet Digest” and “Stories That (Really) Matter: Biblical Reflections.” The latter is a literary work with the approval of Dr. Leland Ryken, Professor Emeritus, Wheaton College (Billy Graham’s alma mater). He is the author or publisher of over 50 books, including “The Christian Imagination”.

Malroy and Gross first met in a group of writers in Fountain Hills almost 30 years ago. Although they have never collaborated on a book, the two criticize each other and get ideas for improving their manuscripts. Monthly meetings with the Fountain Hills Christian Writers Group benefited them and other attendees. Over the years, the writers have met in four different churches in the community. For a while, a smaller group also gathered at the local Denny’s restaurant to discuss all things writing: ideas, markets, characters, plot, readers and literary agents.

The duo said the writing is very personal, so it’s no wonder that deep friendships can and do evolve. Malroy and Gross have traveled to writers’ conferences as far as Texas and Indiana, and as near as Scottsdale. Gross has attended the famous Iowa Summer Writers Workshop twice. There she studied with the late WP Kinsella, author of “Shoeless Joe”, which was later adapted into the film “Field of Dreams”. On another occasion, she studied with the late Ray Bradbury, a famous science fiction writer for “Fahrenheit 451”. Malroy studied with Oregon Poet Laureate the late Dr. William Stafford, who has written 35 books and won a National Book Award for “Traveling Through the Dark.”

Malroy and Gross have both traveled extensively, sometimes together. They visited Estonia, Russia and Sweden on an occasion where they experienced cultures, people and ideas as the raw material for future writings. Malroy’s historical fiction, “Forever Loving”, is set in the North American colonies ending on St. Edward Island, Canada. Malroy’s ancestors once lived there and recently she visited the island with members of her family.

Gross has published over 200 articles and has been a fan of classic short stories since graduating from Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa. From her love of literature and the Bible, she compared 15 famous short stories with 15 Bible stories. The result is a critical thinking-based analysis resulting in a reading experience that she believes can be enjoyed by teenage students through to baby boomers.

Both books by the two authors were rated favorably by Elsie Hoffarber in the Fountain Hills Presbyterian Church publication, “Library Footnotes.” She said, “In our library there is a waiting list for Effie and Rosemarie’s books.”

On Saturday, December 11, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., a book signing will be held in Ballroom 1 of the Fountain Hills Community Center. A program starting at 2:30 p.m. features local soloist Cassie Hanson, readings by Malroy and Gross, a draw for prizes (valued up to $ 300), vocals, refreshments and personalized / signed copies . The community is invited to attend for free. The sale of books will be available. They are also available on Amazon.


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The best books I’ve read this year (2021 edition) https://holy-bibles.org/the-best-books-ive-read-this-year-2021-edition/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 22:28:38 +0000 https://holy-bibles.org/the-best-books-ive-read-this-year-2021-edition/ 2021 has been a banner year on the reading front, but maybe not exactly what I expected. My grandson’s entry into the world sent me to probe the depths of the Dr. Seuss and PD Eastman cannons, release the classics Berenstain Bears, and see how well I can nail the tongue twisters of Fox in […]]]>

2021 has been a banner year on the reading front, but maybe not exactly what I expected. My grandson’s entry into the world sent me to probe the depths of the Dr. Seuss and PD Eastman cannons, release the classics Berenstain Bears, and see how well I can nail the tongue twisters of Fox in socks. I can’t wait until he’s old enough for The Chronicles of Narnia, Beverly Cleary, Harry Potter and so many more.

That being said, I’ve also managed to do a fair amount of personal reading – I haven’t quite hit the 200-pound mark this year, but I’m looking to record around 180 volumes or so. Having less time for my own studies forced me to prioritize things that I really wanted to read, which ended up being a good thing.

I have already praised here the incredible novel by Sigrid Undset Kristin lavransdatter, so let’s consider this one as a gift. Here are ten of the other books that I bought this year that really made an impact.

The decline of the West (Oswald Spengler)

Spengler’s opus is a massive and fuzzy interpretation of world history on the largest scale possible. Simply put, his project boils down to a theory of the defining characteristics and life cycles of the great cultures of the world, ranging from Mesoamerican to Babylonian to Russian. In Spengler’s account, the great cultures are unified by the metaphysical representations of the world in their respective hearts – from the “Way” of the Egyptians to the “garden” of the Chinese. As a culture ages, the response of its inhabitants to this image of the world inevitably shifts from religious awe to rationalism, scientism and decadence. Of course, any work like this is inherently daring and extravagant, and there are plenty of places one can poke holes in Spengler’s thesis, but I could hardly let go of this book. This is what genius looks like.

Aspects of Truth: A New Religious Metaphysics (Catherine Pickstock)

Aspects of truth, the latest volume from the great dean of the Radical Orthodoxy movement, is a resounding articulation and defense of the Christian philosophical tradition against virtually all assailants – from the two the analytical and continental traditions of philosophy. In its depth and breadth, Aspects of truth is to metaphysics what Alasdair MacIntyre Ethics in the conflicts of modernity is to moral philosophy. It is decidedly not an entry-level job and probably requires a university education in philosophical theology to really enjoy, but those with a taste for intellectual brilliance will find a lot to like here.

The ecclesiastical text: criticism, biblical authority and popular spirit (Théodore P. Letis)

In this collection of essays, the late scholar (and Lutheran theologian) Theodore Letis makes a provocative argument that the Protestant quest for the “original autographs” of Scripture is wrong, giving way too much to modernist methods. Instead, Letis argues that what matters is the ecclesiastical text handed down by the church through time (perhaps even including supposedly “later” texts like the Johannine comma and the long ending of Mark. ) – a position that brought him into the strange company of KJV-onlyists. In doing so, Letis defends an understanding of sola scripturawhich fully recognizes the fact that the Bible exists in, with and for the church. Whatever your denominational allegiance, the unconventional and surprisingly brilliant case of Letis deserves your attention.

Between two fires (Christophe Buehlman)

The only way I can describe this historical horror-thriller novel is something like “Cormac McCarthy’s The road mixed with that of Frank Peretti This darkness presents, which takes place during the Black Death. It’s a high-testosterone roller coaster of a book that manages to be both spectacularly gruesome, theologically sophisticated, and deeply moving.

Old Path White Clouds: Walking in the Footsteps of the Buddha (Thích Nhất Hạnh)

If, like me, your exposure to the Buddhist tradition has been mostly limited to fragments of pop culture, the intellectual biography of Siddhartha Gautama by Thích Nhất Hạnh is the perfect entry point for further study. In easy and accessible prose, Old path of white clouds describes the early history and fundamentals of Theravada Buddhism, explaining complex ideas that might otherwise seem foreign to those of us with a completely Western worldview. Yes, it’s 600 pages, but they go by fast.

Halakhah: the rabbinical idea of ​​the law (Chaim N. Saiman)

I will freely admit that over the years I haven’t read much about Jewish “Tradition”! this violin on the roof‘s Tevye so famously defended – let alone the complex legal web of Torah reflections that have developed within Jewish scholarship for millennia. Saiman’s study on halacha, or Jewish law, is an accessible scholarly introduction to how these laws emerged over time and how they actually work in practice. Saiman makes the compelling argument that debates over the most obscure points of law – covering impossible situations that would never happen in reality – are, in a sense, religious devotions, discussions through which all things of the world can be seen as ordained to God. . A perfect read for the curious and legal-minded soul.

The invention of religion in Japan (Jason Ananda Josephson Storm)

Josephson Storm offers an interdisciplinary exploration of how the notoriously controversial concept of ‘religion’ – as a central category encompassing traditions as different as Christianity and Buddhism – became rooted in a Japanese civilization that had no native word for this concept. Most notable is this book’s exploration of the deliberate construction of a “Shinto state” ideology as a uniquely Japanese tool for navigating westernized modernity. This required the development of a new theology drawing on Japanese folk traditions and combining them with a new appreciation of Western science and industrialization, to the point of even re-designing the afterlife as a mechanized fantasia rather than as a the traditional grassy fields. In short, Josephson Storm’s argument points to the uncomfortable suggestion that attempts to revive cultural traditions in the face of hostile cross-pressures are inevitably transformations of these traditions. If you liked Charles Taylor A secular age and want to take it to the next level, this volume is for you.

Klara and the sun (Kazuo Ishiguro)

Like everything Ishiguro writes, Klara and the sun is a treasure. This latest novel tells, in the first person, the story of Klara, an “artificial friend” (semi-sensitive robot) responsible for serving as a companion to the sick human girl Josie. As a solar powered automaton, Klara depends on the sun for all things and comes to worship it as a god. And as Josie’s illness progresses, it quickly becomes clear that Klara’s role may not be what she initially envisioned, forcing Klara to trust powers beyond her. -same. Culminating in one of the best endings Ishiguro has ever written, this book is a powerful journey through memory, identity, and every rational creature’s compelling orientation to the divine.

The structure of scientific revolutions (Thomas S. Kuhn)

Kuhn’s groundbreaking volume is the kind of text that steadily makes its way into college curricula, but no one actually reads it. At its core, it is a thoughtful examination of the historical contingencies underlying what counts as “science.” Instead of reflecting a smooth progression from ignorance to knowledge, Kuhn argues, the history of science must portray a tradition torn apart by fundamental, game-changing paradigm shifts, after which scientists use different methods to answer different questions. The implications of Kuhn’s thesis are far-reaching, especially once they really sink in; internalize Kuhn, and you will inevitably be uncomfortable with occasional public calls to “what the science tells us.” (A reading worthy of follow-up is that of Bruno Latour We were never modern.)

Before Auschwitz: What Christian Theology Should Learn from the Rise of Nazism (Paul R. Hinlicky)

In this hard-to-categorize volume, Lutheran theologian Paul Hinlicky examines historical research on German Lutheran complicity with Hitler’s Reich from an overtly theological perspective, asking tough questions about political quietude, the metaphysics of theology. Nazi and the relationship of the Christian Church to anti-Semitism history. While Hinlicky’s own constructive theological propositions are more suggestive than systematic, this is not a drawback; Before Auschwitz is a unique work of meta-history that is keenly aware of the inevitable ways in which theological commitments (of whatever sort) shape historical analysis, and the book even points to a decidedly “postliberal” Lutheran critique of liberal society. -modern capitalist. I will come back to this one several times in the years to come.

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Some honorable mentions should be Albion’s Seed: Four British Folk Traditions in America (David Hackett Fischer), Hail Mary project (Andy Weir), and The flamboyant world (Siri Hustvedt).

What are your favorite books from 2021? Feel free to share in the comments!


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